2017 Pushcart Nomination

I am incredibly surprised, honored, delighted, and all of the other delightful emotions tied up in gratitude, to learn that Nat. Brut nominated a short story of mine for a 2017 Pushcart Prize.

That's me, top right. Honored to be included with nominees Paula Jane Mendoza, Cecca Ochoa, Lane Emmons, and Spencer Enfield. 

That's me, top right. Honored to be included with nominees Paula Jane Mendoza, Cecca Ochoa, Lane Emmons, and Spencer Enfield. 

The editors at Nat. Brut are talented and visionary and it was a treat to work with them. The story, The Monster at the End, is at this link.  

I wrote a report on journalism in Nigeria

Last fall, I was incredibly lucky to get the chance to join Reboot for research in Lagos, Nigeria, studying how journalists navigate the changing media landscape in West Africa. A public version of the report we wrote, with support from Omidyar Network, was just released: 

"The historic 2015 Nigerian general election demonstrates this virtuous cycle. Citizens photographed polling results, compared them to the official government results, and discussed their analyses on social media. Their evidence spread across new and traditional media, giving their contributions audience and influence, which in turn incentivized more citizen participation. "Despite citizens’ critical role in reshaping media and improving governance, surprisingly few organizations are thinking deeply or critically about how to leverage them for both social impact and financial sustainability. Beyond the low-hanging fruit of elections and major corruption scandals, citizen energy remains largely untapped."  

"The historic 2015 Nigerian general election demonstrates this virtuous cycle. Citizens photographed polling results, compared them to the official government results, and discussed their analyses on social media. Their evidence spread across new and traditional media, giving their contributions audience and influence, which in turn incentivized more citizen participation.

"Despite citizens’ critical role in reshaping media and improving governance, surprisingly few organizations are thinking deeply or critically about how to leverage them for both social impact and financial sustainability. Beyond the low-hanging fruit of elections and major corruption scandals, citizen energy remains largely untapped."  

Read the full report (it's fascinating stuff) at: http://westafricamedia.reboot.org/ 

 

 

Developing a Human-Centered Writing Practice

This short blog post was inspired in part by my writing training program (learn more about that here). I was thrilled when Reboot agreed to publish this on their site. An excerpt:    

A lot of people hate writing. But most of us like having written (as Dorothy Parker said), especially in the social sector. Strong writing can advance a career and win grants and contracts. At its best, writing can shape change. The number of toolkits and manifestos that pour out of the development and design fields shows our faith in the power of words.

But writing itself is a pain. It always takes more time (and edits) than expected. And, if you scoffed at the words “manifesto” and “toolkit,” you know how much effort goes into documents that fail to get results.

In recent weeks, I’ve led a couple of staff-wide discussions at Reboot about the writing process—what makes it hard, and what can make it better. We kept returning to the core principles of Reboot’s work. As it turns out, good writing is like good design...

Short-listed

My short film Belated (originally published at Narrative) was just short-listed for "The 2015 Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature."  Huzzah!