I wrote a report on journalism in Nigeria

Last fall, I was incredibly lucky to get the chance to join Reboot for research in Lagos, Nigeria, studying how journalists navigate the changing media landscape in West Africa. A public version of the report we wrote, with support from Omidyar Network, was just released: 

"The historic 2015 Nigerian general election demonstrates this virtuous cycle. Citizens photographed polling results, compared them to the official government results, and discussed their analyses on social media. Their evidence spread across new and traditional media, giving their contributions audience and influence, which in turn incentivized more citizen participation. "Despite citizens’ critical role in reshaping media and improving governance, surprisingly few organizations are thinking deeply or critically about how to leverage them for both social impact and financial sustainability. Beyond the low-hanging fruit of elections and major corruption scandals, citizen energy remains largely untapped."  

"The historic 2015 Nigerian general election demonstrates this virtuous cycle. Citizens photographed polling results, compared them to the official government results, and discussed their analyses on social media. Their evidence spread across new and traditional media, giving their contributions audience and influence, which in turn incentivized more citizen participation.

"Despite citizens’ critical role in reshaping media and improving governance, surprisingly few organizations are thinking deeply or critically about how to leverage them for both social impact and financial sustainability. Beyond the low-hanging fruit of elections and major corruption scandals, citizen energy remains largely untapped."  

Read the full report (it's fascinating stuff) at: http://westafricamedia.reboot.org/